FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

COST OF DENTAL TREATMENT

We follow the current Ontario Dental Association Fee guide to offer all patients a fair price for dental services.

CHIPPED OR BROKEN TOOTH

Broken teeth can almost always be saved. Call your dentist and explain what happened. He or she will see you right away. If it's a small break, your dentist may use a white filling to fix the tooth. If the break is serious, a root canal may be needed. Your tooth may also need a crown (also called a cap).

KNOCKED OUT TOOTH

If the knocked-out tooth is an adult (or permanent) tooth, your dentist may be able to put it back. You must act quickly. If the tooth is put back in place within 10 minutes, it has a fair chance of taking root again. After 2 hours, the chances are poor.
If the tooth looks clean, put it back in its place (its socket). If this is not possible, or if there's a chance that the tooth might be swallowed, put it in a container of cold milk. Go to your dentist, or to the nearest dentist, right away. If you get help within ten minutes, there is a fair chance that the tooth will take root again.

BADLY BITTEN LIP OR TONGUE

If there is bleeding, press down on the part of the mouth that is bleeding. Use a clean cloth to do this. If the lip is swollen, use an ice pack to keep the swelling down. If the bleeding does not stop, go to Emergency at a hospital right away.

SOMETHING STUCK BETWEEN TEETH

First, try using dental floss, very gently and carefully, to remove the object. Never poke between your teeth with a pin or similar sharp, pointy object; it can cut your gums or scratch the tooth surface. If you can't get the object out, see your dentist.

LOST FILLING

Put a piece of softened sugarless chewing gum in the spot where the filling was lost. This will protect the area for a short period of time. See a dentist as soon as possible.

SWELLING OF FACE OR GUMS

Call your dentist immediately. If you cannot be seen within 2 hours, go to your nearest emergency hospital or walk-in medical clinic. A swelling of the face or gums is most commonly represents an infection. It is important to see your dentist as soon as possible, even if you have been prescribed antibiotics. The source of the infection must be found and treated.

TOOTHACHE

First call your dentist. Explain your symptoms and ask to be seen as soon as possible. Then ease the pain. Take an over-the-counter pain medicine that works for you, but do not put the pills on your sore tooth. Hold an ice pack against your face at the spot of the sore tooth.
Do not put a heating pad, or any other source of heat on your jaw. Heat will make things worse instead of better.

PAIN TO TEETH FROM COLD AIR OR LIQUID

Every tooth has a nerve. The nerve is stimulated when there is exposed dentin, the inner layer of the tooth or there is a source of inflammation around the root(s) of the tooth. Call your dentist to arrange an appointment to rule out anything serious. Common sources of pain from cold are: gingival recession, wear on teeth, a cavity, tooth grinding, and a cracked tooth.

DENTAL INSURANCE

The majority of Canadians are provided with health and dental plans through their employer as part of their employee benefit package. Many dental benefit plans provide coverage for preventive care, as well as for the treatment of a host of dental health conditions and problems. The actual coverage you receive will depend on how much you and your employer or union have agreed to pay toward the costs of your dental care, and the specific benefits that they have agreed to provide. Remember, your dental plan is not a treatment plan. You should not allow your dental plan to dictate the care you receive. Only you and your dentist can decide the treatment plan that best meets your specific needs and circumstances.

Your actual coverage will depend on how much your employer or union has agreed to pay toward the costs of your dental care, and the specific benefits that your employer or union has agreed to provide. You may also be required to pay an annual deductible or to make co-payments, depending on the type of treatment you require and the provisions of your dental plan. Remember, the purpose of the dental plan is to assist you in paying for dental treatment; most plans do not cover the entire cost of all treatment required. (Click here for details)

POST-SURGICAL INSTRUCTIONS (Click here for details)

DENTAL X-RAYS (Click here for details)

COMMON DENTAL PROCEDURES (Click here for details)