ROOT CANAL TREATMENT ( ENDODONTIC TREATMENT )

CONVENTIONAL (NON-SURGICAL)

Root Canal treatment is indicated when the pulp tissue (internal blood vessels and nerve) become diseased.
Pulpal disease may arise from

• Deep cavity
• Traumatic force from blow to oral tissues or biting
• Tooth crack or fracture
• Severe temperature changes
• Dental treatment in close proximity to pulp

SYMPTOMS OF PULP DISEASE

• Pain to the tooth without a stimulus
• Constant pain to the tooth
• Severe pain to the tooth by hot or cold stimulus
• Abscess on the gum tissue
• Pain to biting on the tooth
• Sometimes there may be no pain to the tooth
• Discoloration of tooth

OBJECTIVES OF TREATMENT

• Remove diseased pulpal tissue
• Seal root canal system to prevent future infection

TREATMENT PROCESS

• A root canal treatment is usually not painful with the help of local anesthetic. Sometimes local anesthetic will not be effective in the presence of an infection and antibiotic treatment may be required prior to starting endodontic treatment.
• Once the tooth is anesthetized, a rubber dam is used to isolate the tooth. The rubber dam will prevent the aspiration (inhalation) or swallowing of the small instruments and solutions used during treatment.
• An access hole is prepared into the tooth. All of the diseased pulp tissue is removed using files. Once the canal(s) is/are cleaned and disinfected, they are filled with a rubber material. The filling material seals the canals from the end of the root to prevent an infection of the tooth.
• The tooth can then be restored. Usually a crown is recommended for a tooth that has undergone root canal treatment. This is because the tooth has essentially been hollowed out, and the walls of the tooth are susceptible to fracture under biting forces. A full coverage crown will protect the tooth from fracture (see crown).